Tips4You - Feed http://tips-4you.eu news from around Thu, 20 Jul 2017 19:25:50 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 71091638 O.J. Simpson asks Nevada parole board for early releasehttp://tips-4you.eu/o-j-simpson-asks-nevada-parole-board-for-early-release/ Thu, 20 Jul 2017 19:23:25 +0000 http://tips-4you.eu/?p=3437

(CNN)O.J. Simpson is scheduled to appear before a parole board in Nevada on Thursday in a hearing that will decide whether one of America's most notorious prisoners will be released.

CNN Special Report "After O.J.: The Fuhrman Tapes Revealed," airing Friday at 10 p.m. ET, uncovers never-before-heard excerpts from the tapes that rocked the "trial of the century."
"Juice," as he was known in his heyday, is nine years into a nine-to-33-year sentence after being convicted in a 2007 kidnapping and armed robbery at a Las Vegas hotel.
But Simpson is best known for his infamous 1995 acquittal in the grisly slayings of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman in what was known as the "trial of the century."

      O.J. Simpson: Football legend to Nevada prisoner

    If paroled, Simpson could be released as early as October, spokesman for the Nevada Board of Parole Commissioners David Smith said.
    Now 70 years old, the former NFL great and movie star has been described by authorities as a model prisoner at Lovelock Correctional Facility, a medium-security prison in the Nevada desert.
    "Simpson has stayed out of trouble there," said Brooke Keast, spokeswoman for the Nevada prisons system. "We haven't heard much from him."
    Thursday's parole hearing comes amid renewed interest in Simpson's story, which has been explored in the award-winning documentary "O.J.: Made in America" and the FX true-crime drama "The People v. O.J. Simpson."
    Though it's been 22 years since that not guilty verdict, the murder trial's themes of criminal justice and race, trust in police, celebrity and domestic violence remain remarkably resonant in modern culture.
    "We act as if the story is O.J.," journalist Celia Farber says toward the end of the "Made in America" documentary. "The story is O.J. and us."

    The robbery

    Simpson and an associate were convicted of kidnapping, armed robbery and assault with a deadly weapon for attempting to steal pieces of Simpson sports memorabilia at gunpoint.
    At his 2008 sentencing, the Hall of Fame running back said he went to the room in The Palace Station hotel to reclaim family heirlooms and other personal items that had been taken from him. He also claimed he didn't know his associates were armed.
    The case, which featured a colorful cast of seedy characters, secret recordings and a Las Vegas heist, read like a low-budget parody of "Ocean's 11," CNN wrote at the time.
    If the four parole board members do not unanimously agree, then two other commissioners from Las Vegas will be called to vote. Simpson needs a simple majority vote to be granted parole. If the vote splits 3-3, parole will be denied and another hearing will be held in six months.
    The parole board scores an inmate on several factors -- the higher the total score, the greater the risk involved in releasing them. A person with a score of zero to five points is deemed low risk; six to 11 points, medium risk; and 12 or more, high risk. In 2013, Simpson scored three points overall.
    Should Simpson again be judged a low risk, the board still has the latitude to deny him parole. Should that happen, Simpson would go before the parole board again before 2020, Smith said.
    Bruce Fromong, a victim in the robbery and kidnapping, has said he plans to testify at the parole hearing to advocate for Simpson's release. "I'm not doing it because he's my friend, which he is. I am doing because the right thing to do," Fromong told CNN.

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    (CNN)O.J. Simpson is scheduled to appear before a parole board in Nevada on Thursday in a hearing that will decide whether one of America's most notorious prisoners will be released.

    CNN Special Report "After O.J.: The Fuhrman Tapes Revealed," airing Friday at 10 p.m. ET, uncovers never-before-heard excerpts from the tapes that rocked the "trial of the century."
    "Juice," as he was known in his heyday, is nine years into a nine-to-33-year sentence after being convicted in a 2007 kidnapping and armed robbery at a Las Vegas hotel.
    But Simpson is best known for his infamous 1995 acquittal in the grisly slayings of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman in what was known as the "trial of the century."

        O.J. Simpson: Football legend to Nevada prisoner

      If paroled, Simpson could be released as early as October, spokesman for the Nevada Board of Parole Commissioners David Smith said.
      Now 70 years old, the former NFL great and movie star has been described by authorities as a model prisoner at Lovelock Correctional Facility, a medium-security prison in the Nevada desert.
      "Simpson has stayed out of trouble there," said Brooke Keast, spokeswoman for the Nevada prisons system. "We haven't heard much from him."
      Thursday's parole hearing comes amid renewed interest in Simpson's story, which has been explored in the award-winning documentary "O.J.: Made in America" and the FX true-crime drama "The People v. O.J. Simpson."
      Though it's been 22 years since that not guilty verdict, the murder trial's themes of criminal justice and race, trust in police, celebrity and domestic violence remain remarkably resonant in modern culture.
      "We act as if the story is O.J.," journalist Celia Farber says toward the end of the "Made in America" documentary. "The story is O.J. and us."

      The robbery

      Simpson and an associate were convicted of kidnapping, armed robbery and assault with a deadly weapon for attempting to steal pieces of Simpson sports memorabilia at gunpoint.
      At his 2008 sentencing, the Hall of Fame running back said he went to the room in The Palace Station hotel to reclaim family heirlooms and other personal items that had been taken from him. He also claimed he didn't know his associates were armed.
      The case, which featured a colorful cast of seedy characters, secret recordings and a Las Vegas heist, read like a low-budget parody of "Ocean's 11," CNN wrote at the time.
      If the four parole board members do not unanimously agree, then two other commissioners from Las Vegas will be called to vote. Simpson needs a simple majority vote to be granted parole. If the vote splits 3-3, parole will be denied and another hearing will be held in six months.
      The parole board scores an inmate on several factors -- the higher the total score, the greater the risk involved in releasing them. A person with a score of zero to five points is deemed low risk; six to 11 points, medium risk; and 12 or more, high risk. In 2013, Simpson scored three points overall.
      Should Simpson again be judged a low risk, the board still has the latitude to deny him parole. Should that happen, Simpson would go before the parole board again before 2020, Smith said.
      Bruce Fromong, a victim in the robbery and kidnapping, has said he plans to testify at the parole hearing to advocate for Simpson's release. "I'm not doing it because he's my friend, which he is. I am doing because the right thing to do," Fromong told CNN.

      More From this publisher : HERE

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      3437
      Qatar’s US ambassador: We can live under Arab embargo ‘forever’http://tips-4you.eu/qatars-us-ambassador-we-can-live-under-arab-embargo-forever/ Thu, 20 Jul 2017 16:19:59 +0000 http://tips-4you.eu/?p=3434

      (CNN)Qatar's ambassador to the United States has called for an end to the ongoing "blockade" of his country by a coalition of Arab states, while defiantly stating they could live under the embargo indefinitely.

      "There is no damage to our economy. Qatar is solid in its economy and we are comfortable and we can continue like this forever," ambassador Meshal bin Hamad Al-Thani told CNN.
      The Middle East was plunged into one of its worst diplomatic crises in decades on June 5 when the four countries -- Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates -- announced they would be cutting ties to Qatar over its alleged support of terrorism.
        They provided a list of 13 demands to the Qatari government, including shuttering the Al Jazeera media network and reducing diplomatic ties with Iran. Qatar's foreign minister said the list was "made to be rejected."

          Gulf nations demand Qatar shut down Al Jazeera

        In an interview with CNN's Richard Quest, Al-Thani said the crisis was counterproductive to the region and to the fight against terrorism.
        "The State of Qatar has demonstrated its constructive approach to resolve this crisis and we have called many times to have a meeting to sit and discuss this ... so now it's up to the boycotting countries to decide and come to the table," he said.

        Saudi Arabia softening on demands?

        Al-Thani's comments came as representatives for the four nations boycotting Qatar appeared willing to slightly relax their strict demands on the isolated state.
        At a briefing for select media in New York on Wednesday, Saudi Arabian ambassador to the UN Abdullah bin Yahya Al-Mouallimi emphasized the importance of the six principles for renewal of diplomatic relations with Qatar, which were agreed to by boycotting nations on July 5 in Cairo.

          Secret docs show Qatar, neighbors agreement

        "There are principles and there are tools (among the 13 demands)," the Saudi ambassador said during the briefing, implying some of them may be negotiable.
        The six principles are much less strict than the original demands, and are made up of broad requests such as "suspending all acts of provocation and speeches inciting to hatred or violence," according to Bahrain's state media. They don't include any action against Al Jazeera.
        During the briefing, Al-Mouallimi again accused Qatar of financing terrorism and backing extremism in the region, accusations that Qatar firmly rejects.
        When asked after the briefing whether the four countries were backing down on their 13 demands, Al-Mouallimi deferrred.
        "I didn't discuss the demands or giving up on those demands. I talked about the important thing now being the commitment to the six principles ... that statement was the last one to express the comprehensive point of view of the participating countries," he said.

        No talks scheduled

        There are still no talks arranged between Qatar and the boycotting nations, despite US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson's efforts during a visit to the region in July.

          Qatar FM calls list of demands unrealistic

        Speaking to reporters as his plane left the Qatari capital of Doha, Tillerson said any resolution "may take quite a while."
        "There's a changed sense of willingness to at least be open to talking to one another and that was not the case before I came," he said.

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        (CNN)Qatar's ambassador to the United States has called for an end to the ongoing "blockade" of his country by a coalition of Arab states, while defiantly stating they could live under the embargo indefinitely.

        "There is no damage to our economy. Qatar is solid in its economy and we are comfortable and we can continue like this forever," ambassador Meshal bin Hamad Al-Thani told CNN.
        The Middle East was plunged into one of its worst diplomatic crises in decades on June 5 when the four countries -- Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates -- announced they would be cutting ties to Qatar over its alleged support of terrorism.
          They provided a list of 13 demands to the Qatari government, including shuttering the Al Jazeera media network and reducing diplomatic ties with Iran. Qatar's foreign minister said the list was "made to be rejected."

            Gulf nations demand Qatar shut down Al Jazeera

          In an interview with CNN's Richard Quest, Al-Thani said the crisis was counterproductive to the region and to the fight against terrorism.
          "The State of Qatar has demonstrated its constructive approach to resolve this crisis and we have called many times to have a meeting to sit and discuss this ... so now it's up to the boycotting countries to decide and come to the table," he said.

          Saudi Arabia softening on demands?

          Al-Thani's comments came as representatives for the four nations boycotting Qatar appeared willing to slightly relax their strict demands on the isolated state.
          At a briefing for select media in New York on Wednesday, Saudi Arabian ambassador to the UN Abdullah bin Yahya Al-Mouallimi emphasized the importance of the six principles for renewal of diplomatic relations with Qatar, which were agreed to by boycotting nations on July 5 in Cairo.

            Secret docs show Qatar, neighbors agreement

          "There are principles and there are tools (among the 13 demands)," the Saudi ambassador said during the briefing, implying some of them may be negotiable.
          The six principles are much less strict than the original demands, and are made up of broad requests such as "suspending all acts of provocation and speeches inciting to hatred or violence," according to Bahrain's state media. They don't include any action against Al Jazeera.
          During the briefing, Al-Mouallimi again accused Qatar of financing terrorism and backing extremism in the region, accusations that Qatar firmly rejects.
          When asked after the briefing whether the four countries were backing down on their 13 demands, Al-Mouallimi deferrred.
          "I didn't discuss the demands or giving up on those demands. I talked about the important thing now being the commitment to the six principles ... that statement was the last one to express the comprehensive point of view of the participating countries," he said.

          No talks scheduled

          There are still no talks arranged between Qatar and the boycotting nations, despite US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson's efforts during a visit to the region in July.

            Qatar FM calls list of demands unrealistic

          Speaking to reporters as his plane left the Qatari capital of Doha, Tillerson said any resolution "may take quite a while."
          "There's a changed sense of willingness to at least be open to talking to one another and that was not the case before I came," he said.

          More From this publisher : HERE

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          3434
          McCain faces his greatest battlehttp://tips-4you.eu/mccain-faces-his-greatest-battle/ Thu, 20 Jul 2017 12:59:18 +0000 http://tips-4you.eu/?p=3431

          Washington (CNN)John McCain has always lived for the fight. Now he's facing his toughest battle.

          The Arizona Republican senator has often seemed indestructible, despite the best efforts of his Vietnam War gaolers, an earlier bout with melanoma and a list of honorable political defeats. And now he has been diagnosed with brain cancer, as CNN reported Wednesday,
          He's a warrior politician who bears the scars of a lifetime of military and political campaigns and health scares on his body and across his soul. He's collected more enemies and friends than most men and is a certified national hero.

            Eight years ago, McCain, one of the last giants of the Senate, stood before the flag-draped coffin of his friend and sparring partner Sen. Edward Kennedy, who had succumbed to the same disease he is now fighting, and explained their common approach to life.
            "Ted and I shared the sentiment that a fight not joined was a fight not enjoyed," McCain said, recalling roiling arguments with his fellow Senate lion, but also times when they had buried their differences to forge progress for the nation.
            McCain has said he's itching to get back to work after his surgery nearly a week ago and has been working the phones. But he was told not to travel for two weeks. Now, his movements could be curtailed further by treatments that could include chemotherapy and radiation.
            Long-term, McCain's outlook is daunting. His doctors told CNN's Sanjay Gupta with McCain's permission that he was suffering from a gliobastoma tumor, an aggressive form of cancer. Kennedy, who was also diagnosed during a bitter Senate showdown over health care, survived for about 15 months after a similar diagnosis.
            McCain's office said in a statement that the Arizona senator appreciates the outpouring of support he had received since going into the hospital.
            "He is grateful to the doctors and staff at Mayo Clinic for their outstanding care, and is confident that any future treatment will be effective."
            One thing is for sure though, McCain will fight -- something one of his former opponents pointed out Wednesday night.
            "John McCain is an American hero & one of the bravest fighters I've ever known," former President Barack Obama tweeted. "Cancer doesn't know what it's up against. Give it hell, John."
            His daughter, Meghan, issued a statement paying tribute to her father when his diagnosis became public.
            "He is the toughest person I know. The cruelest enemy could not break him. The aggressions of political life could not bend him ... cancer may afflict him in many ways; but it will not make him surrender. Nothing ever has."
            Throughout his military and political career, McCain has been the epitome of his hero President Theodore's Roosevelt's "Man in the Arena," whose face is "marred by dust and sweat and blood" and who fails often "daring greatly" unlike timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

            Fixture of Capitol Hill

            But that combative streak has sometimes revealed a brittle, impetuous side of his personality that may have limited the ultimate height of his military and political careers and has often emerged in high pressure moments.

              McCain 'almost speechless' over Trump comments

            Still, McCain is also a throwback, maintaining friendships with rivals across the political aisle, which often got testy, as when he confronted Hillary Clinton and fellow Vietnam War veteran John Kerry at committee hearings when they were in the Senate with him.
            When he lost to Obama in the 2008 election, McCain entered a dark period of his public life, often coming across as angry and not yet having come to terms with his defeat.
            But the Republican recapture of the Senate in the 2014 mid-term election gave him a chance to rewrite the final chapter of his career, as he at long last took the gavel of the Senate armed services committee, an assignment he had long coveted. Soon, he was taking the Obama administration to task over its policies in Iraq, Syria and Ukraine.
            But he knew his time was limited.
            "Every single day," McCain told the New York Times in 2015, "is a day less that I am going to be able to serve in the Senate."
            McCain, elected just last fall to his sixth Senate term, inadvertently found himself at the center of the 2016 presidential election race when he was attacked by Donald Trump who said: "He was not a war hero," Trump said in Iowa in 2015.
            "He was a war hero because he was captured. I like people who weren't captured."

              Donald Trump won't apologize to John McCain

            The comment triggered outrage, given McCain's war record. But it also marked an important moment in political history -- for the first time displaying Trump's capacity for getting away with behavior that would have sunk other candidates.
            McCain's tense relationship with Trump was underlined on Monday, prior to the news of his cancer diagnosis, when the President said he hoped that the Arizona senator would get better soon: "Because we miss him. He is a crusty voice in Washington .... plus, we need his vote."
            In recent weeks, McCain has emerged as a source of colorful quotes for reporters over the Russia cloud swirling around Trump, repeatedly predicting that "there will be more shoes to drop" in what he has painted as a classic Washington scandal. He has also made clear his disdain for any efforts to improve relations with Russian President Vladimir Putin.
            The Arizona senator's absence from Washington in recent days has come at a politically inopportune time for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as he has desperately tried to find a majority to repeal and replace Obamacare.

              GOP senators ridicule Trump proposal

            Any prolonged absences from Washington by the Arizona senator will further reduce McConnell's already wafer-thin majority.
            This week, after the health care push floundered, McCain broke ranks and called for discussions with Democrats and a committee process to finally provide "Americans with access to quality and affordable health care."
            McCain has often joked he is "older than dirt."
            But though he is now 80, McCain has made few concessions to his age. He has maintained a punishing schedule of world travel that would exhaust a man half his age. He often pops up on Sunday talk shows, direct from Arizona in the dawn hours. The Washington Post reported last month that McCain had traveled 75,000 miles to more than 15 nations so far this year alone.
            His bosom buddy, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, told CNN earlier this week that the hectic pace had taken a toll.
            "You know he just wore himself out traveling all around the world," Graham said.
            It is unknown whether McCain's condition contributed to his somewhat confused line of questioning during fired FBI Director James Comey's appearance on Capitol Hill in June.
            There are constant reminders of his previous battles with mortality however.
            His puffy left cheek and a scar on his face date from melanoma surgery in 2000. During his 2008 campaign, aides had to comb his hair, as he still cannot lift his arms above his head -- thanks to injuries that date from his plane crash and years as a prisoner of war.
            But McCain's experience in Vietnam hardly made him less enamored of the use of military power abroad. Sometimes his outrage over some conflict or example of mass human rights abuses seems to boil out of him, in the conviction that American leadership has been lacking.
            It's an attitude that has seen Democratic critics claim that he is the embodiment of a Republican reflex to respond to every global problem with military force, which led America into misadventures like the war in Iraq.
            His hawkish worldview is reflected on the walls of McCain's Senate conference room, which features letters and photos from the likes of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher, leaders who didn't suffer critics gladly.

            From Hanoi Hilton to Washington

            McCain's legend is well known. The son and grandson of admirals, he refused the offer of a preferential release from the infamous Hanoi Hilton prison camp until his comrades could also go home. After his Skyhawk jet was shot down over North Vietnam, McCain was a prisoner for five-and-a-half years, several of them in solitary confinement. He returned home to a nation torn by the war in 1973 and finally retired from the US Navy in 1981. He served in the House of Representatives from 1983 to 1987 as a down-the-line conservative and then succeeded the retiring Barry Goldwater in the Senate.
            His Senate career almost crashed to earth before it began. In 1989 he was among the Keating Five group of senators accused of interfering with regulators in a campaign finance case. He was cleared of wrongdoing, but the Senate ethics committee accused him of poor judgment, an experience which led to him becoming a pioneer of campaign finance reform.
            He joined Kerry to facilitate the reconciliation and the eventual re-opening of diplomatic relations between the United States and Vietnam.
            By 2000, he set his sights on the White House and ran as a maverick Republican holding court for hours in candid back-and-forth sessions with reporters on his campaign bus. His effort was eventually crushed by then-Texas Gov. George W. Bush after a brutal South Carolina primary campaign and he returned to the Senate, in time for a deeply consequential period that saw national security policy dominate Washington with the 9/11 attacks in 2001 and the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, of which McCain was a strong supporter.
            McCain, who is often seen on Capitol Hill at the center of a gaggle of reporters, was once so beloved by the press that he once joked the media was his "base."
            By late 2007, he was ready for his next battle -- another presidential campaign, and this time won the Republican nomination but ended up coming up short against Obama in 2008.
            History may best remember his campaign for his selection of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his vice presidential pick, a move that was hailed as bold at the time, but was later criticized as his running mate's inexperience led critics to charge she was unqualified to be a heartbeat away from the presidency.
            If the past is any guide, McCain will be reacting to his diagnosis with his characteristic humor. One of his favorite lines on the stump tells how he got over his defeat to Obama in 2008.
            "After I lost, my friends, I slept like a baby sleep two hours, wake up and cry."

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            Washington (CNN)John McCain has always lived for the fight. Now he's facing his toughest battle.

            The Arizona Republican senator has often seemed indestructible, despite the best efforts of his Vietnam War gaolers, an earlier bout with melanoma and a list of honorable political defeats. And now he has been diagnosed with brain cancer, as CNN reported Wednesday,
            He's a warrior politician who bears the scars of a lifetime of military and political campaigns and health scares on his body and across his soul. He's collected more enemies and friends than most men and is a certified national hero.

              Eight years ago, McCain, one of the last giants of the Senate, stood before the flag-draped coffin of his friend and sparring partner Sen. Edward Kennedy, who had succumbed to the same disease he is now fighting, and explained their common approach to life.
              "Ted and I shared the sentiment that a fight not joined was a fight not enjoyed," McCain said, recalling roiling arguments with his fellow Senate lion, but also times when they had buried their differences to forge progress for the nation.
              McCain has said he's itching to get back to work after his surgery nearly a week ago and has been working the phones. But he was told not to travel for two weeks. Now, his movements could be curtailed further by treatments that could include chemotherapy and radiation.
              Long-term, McCain's outlook is daunting. His doctors told CNN's Sanjay Gupta with McCain's permission that he was suffering from a gliobastoma tumor, an aggressive form of cancer. Kennedy, who was also diagnosed during a bitter Senate showdown over health care, survived for about 15 months after a similar diagnosis.
              McCain's office said in a statement that the Arizona senator appreciates the outpouring of support he had received since going into the hospital.
              "He is grateful to the doctors and staff at Mayo Clinic for their outstanding care, and is confident that any future treatment will be effective."
              One thing is for sure though, McCain will fight -- something one of his former opponents pointed out Wednesday night.
              "John McCain is an American hero & one of the bravest fighters I've ever known," former President Barack Obama tweeted. "Cancer doesn't know what it's up against. Give it hell, John."
              His daughter, Meghan, issued a statement paying tribute to her father when his diagnosis became public.
              "He is the toughest person I know. The cruelest enemy could not break him. The aggressions of political life could not bend him ... cancer may afflict him in many ways; but it will not make him surrender. Nothing ever has."
              Throughout his military and political career, McCain has been the epitome of his hero President Theodore's Roosevelt's "Man in the Arena," whose face is "marred by dust and sweat and blood" and who fails often "daring greatly" unlike timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

              Fixture of Capitol Hill

              But that combative streak has sometimes revealed a brittle, impetuous side of his personality that may have limited the ultimate height of his military and political careers and has often emerged in high pressure moments.

                McCain 'almost speechless' over Trump comments

              Still, McCain is also a throwback, maintaining friendships with rivals across the political aisle, which often got testy, as when he confronted Hillary Clinton and fellow Vietnam War veteran John Kerry at committee hearings when they were in the Senate with him.
              When he lost to Obama in the 2008 election, McCain entered a dark period of his public life, often coming across as angry and not yet having come to terms with his defeat.
              But the Republican recapture of the Senate in the 2014 mid-term election gave him a chance to rewrite the final chapter of his career, as he at long last took the gavel of the Senate armed services committee, an assignment he had long coveted. Soon, he was taking the Obama administration to task over its policies in Iraq, Syria and Ukraine.
              But he knew his time was limited.
              "Every single day," McCain told the New York Times in 2015, "is a day less that I am going to be able to serve in the Senate."
              McCain, elected just last fall to his sixth Senate term, inadvertently found himself at the center of the 2016 presidential election race when he was attacked by Donald Trump who said: "He was not a war hero," Trump said in Iowa in 2015.
              "He was a war hero because he was captured. I like people who weren't captured."

                Donald Trump won't apologize to John McCain

              The comment triggered outrage, given McCain's war record. But it also marked an important moment in political history -- for the first time displaying Trump's capacity for getting away with behavior that would have sunk other candidates.
              McCain's tense relationship with Trump was underlined on Monday, prior to the news of his cancer diagnosis, when the President said he hoped that the Arizona senator would get better soon: "Because we miss him. He is a crusty voice in Washington .... plus, we need his vote."
              In recent weeks, McCain has emerged as a source of colorful quotes for reporters over the Russia cloud swirling around Trump, repeatedly predicting that "there will be more shoes to drop" in what he has painted as a classic Washington scandal. He has also made clear his disdain for any efforts to improve relations with Russian President Vladimir Putin.
              The Arizona senator's absence from Washington in recent days has come at a politically inopportune time for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as he has desperately tried to find a majority to repeal and replace Obamacare.

                GOP senators ridicule Trump proposal

              Any prolonged absences from Washington by the Arizona senator will further reduce McConnell's already wafer-thin majority.
              This week, after the health care push floundered, McCain broke ranks and called for discussions with Democrats and a committee process to finally provide "Americans with access to quality and affordable health care."
              McCain has often joked he is "older than dirt."
              But though he is now 80, McCain has made few concessions to his age. He has maintained a punishing schedule of world travel that would exhaust a man half his age. He often pops up on Sunday talk shows, direct from Arizona in the dawn hours. The Washington Post reported last month that McCain had traveled 75,000 miles to more than 15 nations so far this year alone.
              His bosom buddy, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, told CNN earlier this week that the hectic pace had taken a toll.
              "You know he just wore himself out traveling all around the world," Graham said.
              It is unknown whether McCain's condition contributed to his somewhat confused line of questioning during fired FBI Director James Comey's appearance on Capitol Hill in June.
              There are constant reminders of his previous battles with mortality however.
              His puffy left cheek and a scar on his face date from melanoma surgery in 2000. During his 2008 campaign, aides had to comb his hair, as he still cannot lift his arms above his head -- thanks to injuries that date from his plane crash and years as a prisoner of war.
              But McCain's experience in Vietnam hardly made him less enamored of the use of military power abroad. Sometimes his outrage over some conflict or example of mass human rights abuses seems to boil out of him, in the conviction that American leadership has been lacking.
              It's an attitude that has seen Democratic critics claim that he is the embodiment of a Republican reflex to respond to every global problem with military force, which led America into misadventures like the war in Iraq.
              His hawkish worldview is reflected on the walls of McCain's Senate conference room, which features letters and photos from the likes of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher, leaders who didn't suffer critics gladly.

              From Hanoi Hilton to Washington

              McCain's legend is well known. The son and grandson of admirals, he refused the offer of a preferential release from the infamous Hanoi Hilton prison camp until his comrades could also go home. After his Skyhawk jet was shot down over North Vietnam, McCain was a prisoner for five-and-a-half years, several of them in solitary confinement. He returned home to a nation torn by the war in 1973 and finally retired from the US Navy in 1981. He served in the House of Representatives from 1983 to 1987 as a down-the-line conservative and then succeeded the retiring Barry Goldwater in the Senate.
              His Senate career almost crashed to earth before it began. In 1989 he was among the Keating Five group of senators accused of interfering with regulators in a campaign finance case. He was cleared of wrongdoing, but the Senate ethics committee accused him of poor judgment, an experience which led to him becoming a pioneer of campaign finance reform.
              He joined Kerry to facilitate the reconciliation and the eventual re-opening of diplomatic relations between the United States and Vietnam.
              By 2000, he set his sights on the White House and ran as a maverick Republican holding court for hours in candid back-and-forth sessions with reporters on his campaign bus. His effort was eventually crushed by then-Texas Gov. George W. Bush after a brutal South Carolina primary campaign and he returned to the Senate, in time for a deeply consequential period that saw national security policy dominate Washington with the 9/11 attacks in 2001 and the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, of which McCain was a strong supporter.
              McCain, who is often seen on Capitol Hill at the center of a gaggle of reporters, was once so beloved by the press that he once joked the media was his "base."
              By late 2007, he was ready for his next battle -- another presidential campaign, and this time won the Republican nomination but ended up coming up short against Obama in 2008.
              History may best remember his campaign for his selection of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his vice presidential pick, a move that was hailed as bold at the time, but was later criticized as his running mate's inexperience led critics to charge she was unqualified to be a heartbeat away from the presidency.
              If the past is any guide, McCain will be reacting to his diagnosis with his characteristic humor. One of his favorite lines on the stump tells how he got over his defeat to Obama in 2008.
              "After I lost, my friends, I slept like a baby sleep two hours, wake up and cry."

              More From this publisher : HERE

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              O.J. Simpson’s rise and fall, from football star to prisonerhttp://tips-4you.eu/o-j-simpsons-rise-and-fall-from-football-star-to-prisoner/ Thu, 20 Jul 2017 09:56:55 +0000 http://tips-4you.eu/?p=3428

              Los Angeles (CNN)O.J. Simpson spent a lifetime in the limelight -- first for his athletic prowess, charm and good looks, then as part of an American tragedy that came to symbolize much of what was controversial in America.

              Prosecutors say Simpson, along with some armed associates, confronted two sports collectors that night and left the room with boxes of Simpson memorabilia. Simpson says he only wanted to reclaim family mementos.
              But a Nevada jury thought otherwise, and found him guilty of kidnapping, armed robbery and assault with a deadly weapon. He was sentenced to 33 years, with the possibility of parole after nine.
                On Thursday, a Nevada parole board will make its recommendation, potentially opening a new chapter in a life that already includes a legacy of fame, fortune and infamy.

                Early years

                Born on July 9, 1947, Orenthal James Simpson grew up in the housing projects of San Francisco's tough Potrero Hill neighborhood, where he lived with his single mother, Eunice, and three siblings.
                When he was 2 years old, he contracted rickets, a muscle and bone disease. The future football Hall of Famer wore leg braces for a few hours every day until he was 5.
                But by high school, Simpson was a stellar football player, eventually ending up at the football juggernaut University of Southern California. As a USC Trojan running back, he set NCAA records and won the Heisman Trophy in 1968. Nicknamed "The Juice," Simpson was the No. 1 draft pick in 1969 and spent nearly his entire 11-year career with the mediocre Buffalo Bills. Despite that, Simpson set a long list of league records on his way to the NFL Hall of Fame.

                Married life and transition from football

                When he was 19 years old, Simpson married his 18-year-old high school sweetheart, Marguerite Whitley, in June 1967. The couple had three children: Arnelle, Jason and Aaren.
                While still playing ball, Simpson began acting, most notably playing a man framed for murder by police in the movie "The Klansman."
                Simpson divorced his wife in March 1979. Tragedy struck five months later, when Aaren drowned in the family swimming pool just before her second birthday. By then, Simpson was already dating an attractive 18-year-old blond waitress, Nicole Brown. Less than a year later they were living together.
                The year 1979 was a transitional one for Simpson. Along with his divorce, the death of his daughter and moving in with Brown, Simpson also quit playing football.
                Now that he was off the gridiron, Simpson found continued success on camera. With his charisma and good looks, many hailed Simpson as a personality who transcended sports, class and race.
                He worked as a sportscaster for NBC, appeared in a variety of movies -- including as the dimwitted Officer Nordberg in the "Naked Gun" series -- and as a pitchman, most memorably in Hertz commercials where he leaps over luggage and dodges passengers in a race to get to his flight. At the time, he was one of the few African-American men who could boast such popularity.
                Simpson and Brown married in 1985, and had two children, daughter Sydney and son Justin.

                A troubled marriage

                By all accounts, the marriage was a tumultuous one. Police showed up at the couple's residence on several occasions, including after a New Year's Eve party in 1989, multiple news outlets reported at the time. Police records said Simpson beat his wife so badly she needed hospital treatment. "He's going to kill me! He's going to kill me!" she cried while running toward officers that night.
                Photographs taken from that time and later used at Simpson's murder trial show Brown-Simpson's badly bruised face. According to an arrest report, Simpson told responding officers, "The police have been out here eight times before, and now you're going to arrest me for this?"
                Simpson pleaded no contest to spousal battery. Simpson later wrote, "I did not plead no contest for any other reason but to protect our privacy, and was advised it would end the press hype."
                Brown's sister Denise later testified it wasn't the first time or the last time Nicole had been attacked by her husband.
                The couple divorced in 1992 after seven years of marriage. An attempted reconciliation failed, but the two remained in contact. The relationship remained a turbulent one. In a deposition during the civil trial in 1997, Simpson acknowledged there were instances when he hurt Nicole, saying, "I take total responsibility."

                Two killings in Brentwood

                A little before midnight on June 12, 1994, Nicole Brown Simpson's dog led a neighbor to the bloodied bodies of Brown Simpson and her friend, Ron Goldman. The two had been stabbed and slashed and left on the walkway to Nicole Brown Simpson's Brentwood condo.
                Four hours later, Simpson checked into a hotel near Chicago's airport -- he'd flown there just before midnight for a promotional engagement. He flew back to LA after being contacted by local police.
                Believing him to be a suspect, police handcuffed him upon his return to Los Angeles. He was questioned and then released. Five days later Simpson agreed to surrender to face murder charges, but he didn't show up. He was declared a fugitive. His friend Robert Kardashian appeared at a news conference and read what he called a suicide letter. Not long after, Simpson was spotted being driven in his white Ford Bronco. Police said he was holding a gun to his head.
                Simpson's childhood friend and former teammate, A.C. Cowlings, was at the wheel, leading a phalanx of squad cars on a 60-mile low-speed chase across Southern California.
                In car-chase obsessed Los Angeles, the spectacle was televised and hundreds of people came out to cheer as the Bronco passed. Simpson eventually surrendered to police at his home.

                The trial of the century

                Simpson pleaded "100% not guilty" and assembled a "dream team" of famous local and national lawyers, including civil rights attorney Johnnie Cochran, star defense attorneys F. Lee Bailey and Alan Dershowitz, and DNA expert Barry Scheck. Also on the team was Simpson's friend Kardashian, father of the Kardashian sisters.
                Lead prosecutors Marcia Clark and Chris Darden focused on the timeline, domestic abuse and the DNA evidence found on the bloody glove discovered at the crime scene and another one at O.J. Simpson's property.
                But the "dream team" raised doubts about the police handling of the evidence and accused one of the lead detectives, Mark Fuhrman, of racial bias. Although Simpson never testified, among the most riveting moments was when prosecutor Darden asked Simpson to put on the infamous gloves -- one of which police said was found at the murder scene, the other at Simpson's property.
                Simpson struggled to do so in front of the jurors, making a show of how the gloves didn't fit. In his summation, Cochran uttered the now famous line, "If it doesn't fit you must acquit."
                The case became a cable news sensation and a nationwide obsession, as tens of millions of viewers tuned in at home and at work. In a time before social media, it was a topic of worldwide conversation. Viewers dissected every witness, every legal nuance, every sidebar conversation and every change in Clark's hairstyle.
                The trial lasted just over eight months, from opening statements to the verdict. After all that time, the jury of nine African-Americans, one Hispanic, and one Caucasian deliberated for four hours before reaching the verdict.

                The verdict is in

                It almost seemed like the world stood still at 10 a.m. Pacific Time on October 3, 1995. Nielsen reported that 53 million people were watching and listening to the verdict.
                As the "not guilty to all counts" verdict was read, Cochran turned and yelled, "Yes!" Kardashian looked stunned. Simpson finally broke into a smile, sighed deeply and mouthed "thank you, thank you" to the jury. Goldman's sister, Kim, bent over, loudly sobbing. Outside the courthouse, hundreds of supporters and critics of Simpson lined the sidewalk. Reaction there, like throughout much of the United States, heavily split along racial lines, with many black Americans celebrating the verdict and many white Americans in shock. In ESPN's 2017 documentary, "O.J.: Made In America," Clark talks about the disparate responses to the not guilty verdict, saying "it was all so much bigger than we were."

                Civil trial

                Simpson wasn't off the hook after the not guilty verdict; the families of Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown filed suit for wrongful death. With no camera in the Santa Monica courtroom, a new set of lawyers and a lower threshold for guilt, Simpson was found liable for the deaths. In February 1997, Simpson was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages, more money than he had. He moved to Florida, where state law prevented his pension and home from being seized to pay the damages. Simpson's Heisman Trophy was ordered sold and brought in $230,000.

                The incident in Vegas

                Thirteen years to the day after Simpson was acquitted of double murder, a jury in Las Vegas found him guilty of armed robbery, kidnapping and 10 other charges.
                He said he was simply trying to reclaim his stolen property from two sports memorabilia dealers, Bruce Fromong and Alfred Beardsley. While Simpson wasn't armed when he confronted the men, at least two of his associates were. Another secretly recorded the planning, the raid and the police response. Simpson is heard yelling, "Don't let nobody out of here." The audio also caught responding officers saying that if California couldn't "get" Simpson, Nevada would. All this was played during Simpson's Nevada criminal trial.
                Simpson's lawyer, Yale Galanter, was concerned the jurors might be tempted to be harsher in their decision making, as a kind of payback for the not guilty verdict in Simpson's criminal murder trial. The jury in the Nevada case deliberated for 13 hours before finding Simpson guilty on 12 charges. In sentencing Simpson, Judge Jackie Glass said it was not "retribution or any payback for anything else." But some believe the sentence was unusually harsh.
                "I think there was a large measure of payback in the Nevada case," said Jeffrey Toobin, a senior legal analyst for CNN who wrote "The Run of His Life" and covered the Simpson trials. "It was dubiously a crime in the first place and to see the very long sentence ... (it) seemed to me that he was being punished for the murder even though the judge said he wasn't," Toobin said.

                Parole hearing

                At a parole hearing in 2013, a physically heavier Simpson shuffled into the hearing and told commissioners he regretted what he'd done. "I just wish I had never gone to that room. I wish I had just said keep it and not worry about it." Simpson was denied parole and sent back to the Lovelock Correctional Center Facility, a medium-security prison in the remote desert town of Lovelock. He's been there since 2008.
                A four member parole panel in Carson City will decide Simpson's fate on Thursday. Simpson will appear through a video feed from prison.
                The commissioners will take into account Simpson's conduct in prison, the severity of his crime and his age. Ron Goldman's father, Fred, told CNN he would not be surprised if Simpson was granted parole. And if that comes true, "The Juice" could be loose in October.

                More From this publisher : HERE

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                Original Post Here: O.J. Simpson’s rise and fall, from football star to prisoner
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                Los Angeles (CNN)O.J. Simpson spent a lifetime in the limelight -- first for his athletic prowess, charm and good looks, then as part of an American tragedy that came to symbolize much of what was controversial in America.

                Prosecutors say Simpson, along with some armed associates, confronted two sports collectors that night and left the room with boxes of Simpson memorabilia. Simpson says he only wanted to reclaim family mementos.
                But a Nevada jury thought otherwise, and found him guilty of kidnapping, armed robbery and assault with a deadly weapon. He was sentenced to 33 years, with the possibility of parole after nine.
                  On Thursday, a Nevada parole board will make its recommendation, potentially opening a new chapter in a life that already includes a legacy of fame, fortune and infamy.

                  Early years

                  Born on July 9, 1947, Orenthal James Simpson grew up in the housing projects of San Francisco's tough Potrero Hill neighborhood, where he lived with his single mother, Eunice, and three siblings.
                  When he was 2 years old, he contracted rickets, a muscle and bone disease. The future football Hall of Famer wore leg braces for a few hours every day until he was 5.
                  But by high school, Simpson was a stellar football player, eventually ending up at the football juggernaut University of Southern California. As a USC Trojan running back, he set NCAA records and won the Heisman Trophy in 1968. Nicknamed "The Juice," Simpson was the No. 1 draft pick in 1969 and spent nearly his entire 11-year career with the mediocre Buffalo Bills. Despite that, Simpson set a long list of league records on his way to the NFL Hall of Fame.

                  Married life and transition from football

                  When he was 19 years old, Simpson married his 18-year-old high school sweetheart, Marguerite Whitley, in June 1967. The couple had three children: Arnelle, Jason and Aaren.
                  While still playing ball, Simpson began acting, most notably playing a man framed for murder by police in the movie "The Klansman."
                  Simpson divorced his wife in March 1979. Tragedy struck five months later, when Aaren drowned in the family swimming pool just before her second birthday. By then, Simpson was already dating an attractive 18-year-old blond waitress, Nicole Brown. Less than a year later they were living together.
                  The year 1979 was a transitional one for Simpson. Along with his divorce, the death of his daughter and moving in with Brown, Simpson also quit playing football.
                  Now that he was off the gridiron, Simpson found continued success on camera. With his charisma and good looks, many hailed Simpson as a personality who transcended sports, class and race.
                  He worked as a sportscaster for NBC, appeared in a variety of movies -- including as the dimwitted Officer Nordberg in the "Naked Gun" series -- and as a pitchman, most memorably in Hertz commercials where he leaps over luggage and dodges passengers in a race to get to his flight. At the time, he was one of the few African-American men who could boast such popularity.
                  Simpson and Brown married in 1985, and had two children, daughter Sydney and son Justin.

                  A troubled marriage

                  By all accounts, the marriage was a tumultuous one. Police showed up at the couple's residence on several occasions, including after a New Year's Eve party in 1989, multiple news outlets reported at the time. Police records said Simpson beat his wife so badly she needed hospital treatment. "He's going to kill me! He's going to kill me!" she cried while running toward officers that night.
                  Photographs taken from that time and later used at Simpson's murder trial show Brown-Simpson's badly bruised face. According to an arrest report, Simpson told responding officers, "The police have been out here eight times before, and now you're going to arrest me for this?"
                  Simpson pleaded no contest to spousal battery. Simpson later wrote, "I did not plead no contest for any other reason but to protect our privacy, and was advised it would end the press hype."
                  Brown's sister Denise later testified it wasn't the first time or the last time Nicole had been attacked by her husband.
                  The couple divorced in 1992 after seven years of marriage. An attempted reconciliation failed, but the two remained in contact. The relationship remained a turbulent one. In a deposition during the civil trial in 1997, Simpson acknowledged there were instances when he hurt Nicole, saying, "I take total responsibility."

                  Two killings in Brentwood

                  A little before midnight on June 12, 1994, Nicole Brown Simpson's dog led a neighbor to the bloodied bodies of Brown Simpson and her friend, Ron Goldman. The two had been stabbed and slashed and left on the walkway to Nicole Brown Simpson's Brentwood condo.
                  Four hours later, Simpson checked into a hotel near Chicago's airport -- he'd flown there just before midnight for a promotional engagement. He flew back to LA after being contacted by local police.
                  Believing him to be a suspect, police handcuffed him upon his return to Los Angeles. He was questioned and then released. Five days later Simpson agreed to surrender to face murder charges, but he didn't show up. He was declared a fugitive. His friend Robert Kardashian appeared at a news conference and read what he called a suicide letter. Not long after, Simpson was spotted being driven in his white Ford Bronco. Police said he was holding a gun to his head.
                  Simpson's childhood friend and former teammate, A.C. Cowlings, was at the wheel, leading a phalanx of squad cars on a 60-mile low-speed chase across Southern California.
                  In car-chase obsessed Los Angeles, the spectacle was televised and hundreds of people came out to cheer as the Bronco passed. Simpson eventually surrendered to police at his home.

                  The trial of the century

                  Simpson pleaded "100% not guilty" and assembled a "dream team" of famous local and national lawyers, including civil rights attorney Johnnie Cochran, star defense attorneys F. Lee Bailey and Alan Dershowitz, and DNA expert Barry Scheck. Also on the team was Simpson's friend Kardashian, father of the Kardashian sisters.
                  Lead prosecutors Marcia Clark and Chris Darden focused on the timeline, domestic abuse and the DNA evidence found on the bloody glove discovered at the crime scene and another one at O.J. Simpson's property.
                  But the "dream team" raised doubts about the police handling of the evidence and accused one of the lead detectives, Mark Fuhrman, of racial bias. Although Simpson never testified, among the most riveting moments was when prosecutor Darden asked Simpson to put on the infamous gloves -- one of which police said was found at the murder scene, the other at Simpson's property.
                  Simpson struggled to do so in front of the jurors, making a show of how the gloves didn't fit. In his summation, Cochran uttered the now famous line, "If it doesn't fit you must acquit."
                  The case became a cable news sensation and a nationwide obsession, as tens of millions of viewers tuned in at home and at work. In a time before social media, it was a topic of worldwide conversation. Viewers dissected every witness, every legal nuance, every sidebar conversation and every change in Clark's hairstyle.
                  The trial lasted just over eight months, from opening statements to the verdict. After all that time, the jury of nine African-Americans, one Hispanic, and one Caucasian deliberated for four hours before reaching the verdict.

                  The verdict is in

                  It almost seemed like the world stood still at 10 a.m. Pacific Time on October 3, 1995. Nielsen reported that 53 million people were watching and listening to the verdict.
                  As the "not guilty to all counts" verdict was read, Cochran turned and yelled, "Yes!" Kardashian looked stunned. Simpson finally broke into a smile, sighed deeply and mouthed "thank you, thank you" to the jury. Goldman's sister, Kim, bent over, loudly sobbing. Outside the courthouse, hundreds of supporters and critics of Simpson lined the sidewalk. Reaction there, like throughout much of the United States, heavily split along racial lines, with many black Americans celebrating the verdict and many white Americans in shock. In ESPN's 2017 documentary, "O.J.: Made In America," Clark talks about the disparate responses to the not guilty verdict, saying "it was all so much bigger than we were."

                  Civil trial

                  Simpson wasn't off the hook after the not guilty verdict; the families of Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown filed suit for wrongful death. With no camera in the Santa Monica courtroom, a new set of lawyers and a lower threshold for guilt, Simpson was found liable for the deaths. In February 1997, Simpson was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages, more money than he had. He moved to Florida, where state law prevented his pension and home from being seized to pay the damages. Simpson's Heisman Trophy was ordered sold and brought in $230,000.

                  The incident in Vegas

                  Thirteen years to the day after Simpson was acquitted of double murder, a jury in Las Vegas found him guilty of armed robbery, kidnapping and 10 other charges.
                  He said he was simply trying to reclaim his stolen property from two sports memorabilia dealers, Bruce Fromong and Alfred Beardsley. While Simpson wasn't armed when he confronted the men, at least two of his associates were. Another secretly recorded the planning, the raid and the police response. Simpson is heard yelling, "Don't let nobody out of here." The audio also caught responding officers saying that if California couldn't "get" Simpson, Nevada would. All this was played during Simpson's Nevada criminal trial.
                  Simpson's lawyer, Yale Galanter, was concerned the jurors might be tempted to be harsher in their decision making, as a kind of payback for the not guilty verdict in Simpson's criminal murder trial. The jury in the Nevada case deliberated for 13 hours before finding Simpson guilty on 12 charges. In sentencing Simpson, Judge Jackie Glass said it was not "retribution or any payback for anything else." But some believe the sentence was unusually harsh.
                  "I think there was a large measure of payback in the Nevada case," said Jeffrey Toobin, a senior legal analyst for CNN who wrote "The Run of His Life" and covered the Simpson trials. "It was dubiously a crime in the first place and to see the very long sentence ... (it) seemed to me that he was being punished for the murder even though the judge said he wasn't," Toobin said.

                  Parole hearing

                  At a parole hearing in 2013, a physically heavier Simpson shuffled into the hearing and told commissioners he regretted what he'd done. "I just wish I had never gone to that room. I wish I had just said keep it and not worry about it." Simpson was denied parole and sent back to the Lovelock Correctional Center Facility, a medium-security prison in the remote desert town of Lovelock. He's been there since 2008.
                  A four member parole panel in Carson City will decide Simpson's fate on Thursday. Simpson will appear through a video feed from prison.
                  The commissioners will take into account Simpson's conduct in prison, the severity of his crime and his age. Ron Goldman's father, Fred, told CNN he would not be surprised if Simpson was granted parole. And if that comes true, "The Juice" could be loose in October.

                  More From this publisher : HERE

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                  Original Post Here: O.J. Simpson’s rise and fall, from football star to prisoner
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                  Senate Hearing Highlights Saudi Arabia’s Responsibility For Suffering In Yemenhttp://tips-4you.eu/senate-hearing-highlights-saudi-arabias-responsibility-for-suffering-in-yemen/ Thu, 20 Jul 2017 04:33:18 +0000 http://tips-4you.eu/?p=3425

                  WASHINGTON Experts on humanitarian issues, including top U.S. officials, used a Senate hearing Tuesday to highlight how U.S. partner Saudi Arabia has exacerbated global hunger with its American-backed military campaign in neighbor state Yemen, where the United Nations says 17 million people lack access to sufficient food and a child under 5 years old dies every 10 minutes of preventable causes.

                  The Saudi-led coalition, which began fighting pro-Iran rebels in Yemen in March 2015, drew particular criticism for preventing the delivery of U.S.-purchased cranes to a vital port through which most food enters the country. Coalition jets which receive U.S. aerial refueling destroyed the original cranes in August 2015 in an assault on the rebel-held port city, Hodeidah. Last year, the Obama administration gave the United Nations World Food Program $3.5 million to buy and install four new cranes to enable deliveries of food, medicine and commercial goods. The coalition turned back the WFP shipment in January.

                  After hearing testimony on the crane issue from U.S. Agency for International Development official Matthew Nims and WFP director David Beasley, the hearings chair, Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.), told HuffPost he believes the Saudis are violating international humanitarian law.

                  During the hearing, Young noted that the WFPs Yemen director had contacted the Saudi government about the crane delivery just recently, on June 27. Beasley said the Saudis provided no reply.

                  In those 3 weeks, as we have waited for the Saudi response, more than 3,000 children have died in Yemen of preventable causes, the senator said. All the while, the Saudi government has delayed and obfuscated and floated red herrings [about why the delivery is impossible] ... I believe those Saudi arguments have today yet again been thoroughly and publicly been discredited. I believe were seeing a disturbing pattern of behavior.

                  The hearing posed a particular challenge for Nims, a career USAID official now serving in a temporary leadership role under the Saudi-friendly Trump administration. He avoided placing direct blame on the Saudi-led coalition. But in response to questions from Young and Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), he said coalition member countries naval blockade of Yemen contributed to aid delivery delays. He also said he was unaware of any U.S. government protest of the Saudi-led coalitions initial destruction of the cranes at Hodeidah.

                  Young also pushed Nims to challenge excuses for the delay in the delivery of the cranes. Without mentioning the Saudis, or their U.S.-aligned partner in the Yemen campaign, the United Arab Emirates, the senator asked the USAID official to comment on claims that humanitarian aid has been stolen at Hodeidah and the port is not safe enough for the cranes.

                  We have investigated this through our partners we have had no evidence of any large-scale humanitarian diversions occurring at the port, Nims said.

                  The relief experts agreed that the Yemen situation was urgent.

                  Ive never seen scenes like the ones that I saw [in Yemen] in my 27 years with the International Committee of the Red Cross, said Dominik Stillhart, the director of operations for the International Committee of the Red Cross, referring to a recent visit to observe the response to a growing cholera outbreak that has already affected more than 300,000 Yemenis.

                  Beasley, a GOP politician with ties to President Donald Trump who took over the WFP earlier this year, said the humanitarian crisis could have major security implications as people become more desperate in a country whereal Qaeda has long had a foothold. Experts believe the terror groups influence has grown because of the chaos since the U.S.-backed coalition became involved in the fight between the internationally recognized Yemeni government the pro-Iran rebels.

                  Beasleys logic is consistent with my consultations with high-ranking military personnel and security experts as I try to determine whether theres any strategic or military logic to the Saudis behavior, Young told HuffPost. Ive come up empty ... I think theyre shooting themselves in the foot and undermining the security of partners like the United States.

                  The senator is one of only a handful of mainstream Republicans to vocally criticize the Saudis. (GOP figures in the small libertarian minority have long been wary of the kingdom.) Last month, Young was one of four Republicans to join 43 Democrats in voting against the first portion of Trumps proposed arms sales to Saudi Arabia.

                  He believes that absent gestures of goodwill from the Saudis to show they are interested in complying with humanitarian law like allowing the cranes in criticism of the kingdoms behavior will only grow.

                  My fervent hope would be that my colleagues... start to demand responsiveness from the Saudis, Young said.

                  Asked if the Saudis new involvement in a regional crisis their Trump-endorsed fight against fellow U.S. partner nation Qatar might distract attention from Yemen, Young said scrutiny of Saudi intentions seemed to only be growing.

                  I dont think the conflict or the tension with Qatar is going to cast a shadow on this humanitarian crisis that has been deepened and broadened because of the Saudis behavior, he added.

                  More From this publisher : HERE

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                  Article Source Here: Senate Hearing Highlights Saudi Arabia’s Responsibility For Suffering In Yemen
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                  WASHINGTON Experts on humanitarian issues, including top U.S. officials, used a Senate hearing Tuesday to highlight how U.S. partner Saudi Arabia has exacerbated global hunger with its American-backed military campaign in neighbor state Yemen, where the United Nations says 17 million people lack access to sufficient food and a child under 5 years old dies every 10 minutes of preventable causes.

                  The Saudi-led coalition, which began fighting pro-Iran rebels in Yemen in March 2015, drew particular criticism for preventing the delivery of U.S.-purchased cranes to a vital port through which most food enters the country. Coalition jets which receive U.S. aerial refueling destroyed the original cranes in August 2015 in an assault on the rebel-held port city, Hodeidah. Last year, the Obama administration gave the United Nations World Food Program $3.5 million to buy and install four new cranes to enable deliveries of food, medicine and commercial goods. The coalition turned back the WFP shipment in January.

                  After hearing testimony on the crane issue from U.S. Agency for International Development official Matthew Nims and WFP director David Beasley, the hearings chair, Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.), told HuffPost he believes the Saudis are violating international humanitarian law.

                  During the hearing, Young noted that the WFPs Yemen director had contacted the Saudi government about the crane delivery just recently, on June 27. Beasley said the Saudis provided no reply.

                  In those 3 weeks, as we have waited for the Saudi response, more than 3,000 children have died in Yemen of preventable causes, the senator said. All the while, the Saudi government has delayed and obfuscated and floated red herrings [about why the delivery is impossible] ... I believe those Saudi arguments have today yet again been thoroughly and publicly been discredited. I believe were seeing a disturbing pattern of behavior.

                  The hearing posed a particular challenge for Nims, a career USAID official now serving in a temporary leadership role under the Saudi-friendly Trump administration. He avoided placing direct blame on the Saudi-led coalition. But in response to questions from Young and Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), he said coalition member countries naval blockade of Yemen contributed to aid delivery delays. He also said he was unaware of any U.S. government protest of the Saudi-led coalitions initial destruction of the cranes at Hodeidah.

                  Young also pushed Nims to challenge excuses for the delay in the delivery of the cranes. Without mentioning the Saudis, or their U.S.-aligned partner in the Yemen campaign, the United Arab Emirates, the senator asked the USAID official to comment on claims that humanitarian aid has been stolen at Hodeidah and the port is not safe enough for the cranes.

                  We have investigated this through our partners we have had no evidence of any large-scale humanitarian diversions occurring at the port, Nims said.

                  The relief experts agreed that the Yemen situation was urgent.

                  Ive never seen scenes like the ones that I saw [in Yemen] in my 27 years with the International Committee of the Red Cross, said Dominik Stillhart, the director of operations for the International Committee of the Red Cross, referring to a recent visit to observe the response to a growing cholera outbreak that has already affected more than 300,000 Yemenis.

                  Beasley, a GOP politician with ties to President Donald Trump who took over the WFP earlier this year, said the humanitarian crisis could have major security implications as people become more desperate in a country whereal Qaeda has long had a foothold. Experts believe the terror groups influence has grown because of the chaos since the U.S.-backed coalition became involved in the fight between the internationally recognized Yemeni government the pro-Iran rebels.

                  Beasleys logic is consistent with my consultations with high-ranking military personnel and security experts as I try to determine whether theres any strategic or military logic to the Saudis behavior, Young told HuffPost. Ive come up empty ... I think theyre shooting themselves in the foot and undermining the security of partners like the United States.

                  The senator is one of only a handful of mainstream Republicans to vocally criticize the Saudis. (GOP figures in the small libertarian minority have long been wary of the kingdom.) Last month, Young was one of four Republicans to join 43 Democrats in voting against the first portion of Trumps proposed arms sales to Saudi Arabia.

                  He believes that absent gestures of goodwill from the Saudis to show they are interested in complying with humanitarian law like allowing the cranes in criticism of the kingdoms behavior will only grow.

                  My fervent hope would be that my colleagues... start to demand responsiveness from the Saudis, Young said.

                  Asked if the Saudis new involvement in a regional crisis their Trump-endorsed fight against fellow U.S. partner nation Qatar might distract attention from Yemen, Young said scrutiny of Saudi intentions seemed to only be growing.

                  I dont think the conflict or the tension with Qatar is going to cast a shadow on this humanitarian crisis that has been deepened and broadened because of the Saudis behavior, he added.

                  More From this publisher : HERE

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                  Article Source Here: Senate Hearing Highlights Saudi Arabia’s Responsibility For Suffering In Yemen
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                  3425